In the News


Excerpts from the current 2016 issue of Media & Arts Law Review (University of Melbourne School of Law) reviewing Hong Kong Media Law, 2d Edition:  “Most authors of media law texts would not expect their books to become important historical reference works for centuries to come. But that is exactly what I predict will eventuate for the University of Hong Kong’s Doreen Weisenhaus with her Hong Kong Media Law: A Guide...

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Hong Kong courts need to improve juror education and procedures to ensure that jurors do not use the internet for their own research during trials, Doreen Weisenhaus told The South China Morning Post in a July 25, 2016 article. The Department of Justice recently decided not to press charges against jurors in a criminal trial who allegedly breached contempt of court rules by collecting outside information from the internet, after Hong...

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April 27, 2016 — Financial and political pressures from mainland China have gradually eroded Hong Kong’s historically free media over the past decade, according to Freedom House’s Freedom of the Press report. The trend has grown worse in tandem with deteriorating conditions on the mainland itself, where an already repressive environment for freedom of expression has become even more restrictive since President Xi Jinping took...

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March 4, 2016 (RTHK) — The government said it plans to move the controversial Copyright (Amendment) Bill to the end of the batch of bills put forward to the legislature for scrutiny. The administration had earlier set March 4 as the deadline for the bill to be passed. The Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development, Greg So, said the reshuffling probably means legislators will not be able to deal with the bill before the...

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Associate Professor Doreen Weisenhaus was one of the speakers at Columbia University’s second annual Global Freedom of Expression and Information conference, “Justice for Free Expression in 2014.” The March 10-11, 2015 conference featured presentations from leading scholars, lawyers and other experts from around the world. Conference participants discussed trends over the previous 12 months in jurisprudence and litigation...

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A recent double murder case may prove to be an important test of Hong Kong’s restrictive laws on what can or cannot be reported on in a pending court case in the internet age. “Hong Kong inherited the UK’s more restrictive approach,” Doreen Weisenhaus told The South China Morning Post in a November 4, 2014 article.  “The presumption is that too much public information about the case would jeopardise a...

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